June C. Nash
We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us: Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines
March 02, 2020 Comments.. 258
We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines In this powerful anthropological study of a Bolivian tin mining town Nash explores the influence of modern industrialization on the traditional culture of Quechua and Aymara speaking Indians

  • Title: We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us: Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines
  • Author: June C. Nash
  • ISBN: 9780231080514
  • Page: 383
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this powerful anthropological study of a Bolivian tin mining town, Nash explores the influence of modern industrialization on the traditional culture of Quechua and Aymara speaking Indians.

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      383 June C. Nash
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      Posted by:June C. Nash
      Published :2020-03-02T01:53:47+00:00

    1 Blog on “We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us: Dependency and Exploitation in Bolivian Tin Mines

    1. Stantontas says:

      Loved this. Even for a non-social scientist it's compelling & readable (if you're interested in the topic, obv.) Like the Lazar book (El Alto, Rebel City: Self and Citizenship in Andean Bolivia), you can't really get your head around current day Bolivia and its social movements without digesting this.Some of the interviews are heart breaking and 40 years on, they're voices that still don't get heard in , e.g. news coverage of South America.

    2. Nick says:

      A classic book that, though Nash shows some undue influence of dependency theory, contains timeless reflections on cultural as well as political-economic instruments of domination and resistance in the context of mining. Perhaps most surprising was how much Nash's analysis prefigured neoliberalism (debt in particular) during what is now widely considered to be a time when Latin America was still growing economically (before the debt-service-fueled fall).

    3. Colin says:

      I liked this book, I read it before I went to bolivia in 96.

    4. Sarah Price says:

      Informative and interesting, but depressing.

    5. Monica says:

      Read this for thesis and Anth 421: Marx and Marxian Anthropologies.

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