Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings
The Bitterwood Bible
April 25, 2019 Comments.. 573
The Bitterwood Bible Welcome back to the magic and pathos of Angela Slatter s exquisitely imagined tales The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings returns to the world of Sourdough and Other Stories Tartarus intr

  • Title: The Bitterwood Bible
  • Author: Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 350
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Welcome back to the magic and pathos of Angela Slatter s exquisitely imagined tales The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings returns to the world of Sourdough and Other Stories Tartarus, 2010 , introducing readers to the tales that came before Stories where coffin makers work hard to keep the dead beneath where a plague maiden steals away the children of an ungratefuWelcome back to the magic and pathos of Angela Slatter s exquisitely imagined tales The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings returns to the world of Sourdough and Other Stories Tartarus, 2010 , introducing readers to the tales that came before Stories where coffin makers work hard to keep the dead beneath where a plague maiden steals away the children of an ungrateful village where poison girls are schooled in the art of assassination where pirates disappear from the seas where families and the ties that bind them can both ruin and resurrect and where books carry forth fairy tales, forbidden knowledge and dangerous secrets The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings is enhanced by eighty six pen and ink illustrations by artist Kathleen Jennings.

    • Best Read [Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings] ↠ The Bitterwood Bible || [Christian Book] PDF ☆
      350 Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings] ↠ The Bitterwood Bible || [Christian Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Angela Slatter Stephen Jones Kathleen Jennings
      Published :2019-04-25T07:32:02+00:00

    1 Blog on “The Bitterwood Bible

    1. Bradley says:

      Always clear and hauntingly beautiful, Angela Slatter can be realistically called one of the masters of the short fiction form, balancing earthy and detailed characters and settings that suck you in against chillingly dreadful stories of degradation, revenge, and magic.Each story is poetry, but what really gets to me is the fact that each story in this collection, as with Sourdough, are connected.Not all of them are obviously connected, and in fact, between these two books, they range over great [...]

    2. Randolph Carter says:

      Astonishing fairy tale fantasy novel told through a series of loosely connected short stories. The stories could, in most cases, stand alone, but when taken as a whole, well, it's greater than the sum of its parts. The place and time are fictional, think Wales and the Dark Ages, and just about anything can happen. This is a story about women and how they saved the world's knowledge that is so bewitching that it is hard to compare it to anything else. Angela Carter comes to mind and maybe a littl [...]

    3. Geticus Polus says:

      Imagine yourself as a six years old rug rat with a burning passion for everything ghastly and ghostly: haunted houses, satyrs, enchanted hills, strange gaunt gentlemen, more haunted stuff and so on. Now imagine that your uncle is Ray Russell. Once a week you will visit him at his house and there you will spend all day looking with wide-eyes at those shelves with old, musty, dusty books. Please, uncle Ray, read me a story, you will say. And Uncle Ray will open a book and he will read you a story [...]

    4. Seregil of Rhiminee says:

      Originally published at Risinghadow.Angela Slatter's The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings was a pleasant surprise for me, because it's an excellent collection of dark fantasy stories and dark fairy-tale-like stories for adults. As a long time fan of the darker and literary side of speculative fiction I can mention that this collection is a unique and rewarding reading experience to those who love literary dark fantasy stories.Because I was deeply impressed by the author's stories and her w [...]

    5. S.B. Wright says:

      Angela Slatter has, along with her regular partner in fiction Lisa L Hannett, been one of those authors I have collected yet never really got around to reading due to the reviewing pile taking precedence over the personal reading pile. Sure, I have read single stories on occasion, enough to know that the money I have put down on her other collections is well spent. The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings from Tartarus, is then the first collection that I have read in its entirety. It’s also [...]

    6. Ian Mond says:

      My thoughts on this incredible short story collection (or mosaic novel) can be found here - writerandcritic.podbean/e/ - episode 42 of the Writer and the Critic podcast.

    7. Victoria (vikz writes) says:

      An excellent read. If you like fairy tale worlds, ghostly apparitions and horrific environments, read this book. This is Slatter at her best and believe me that really is saying about. Angela Slatter is rapidly becoming one of my favorite authors.

    8. Louise says:

      I'm breathless and set adrift. I feel myself buoyed on gently lapping waves, in this world of Angela Slatter's making. The delicacy of words as tactile creatures wraps around me. Oh, how I've missed how luscious stories can be.

    9. Alexandra says:

      Sourdough and Other Stories by Angela Slatter has been on my radar for ages, but somehow I've just never got around to reading it. For a while I didn't realise it was available as an ebook - and Tartarus Press does lovely hard copies, but they're a leedle expensive for a book you're taking a chance on. And I also wasn't sure that these stories were ones that I would really connect with. I mean, yes, I loved "Brisneyland by Night" in Sprawl, and a few others Slatter has written - especially with [...]

    10. Teodor says:

      A rich, rewarding collection of stories that is both playful and immersive. Unlike most fairy tale retellings - and this is a less obvious example of that sub-genre (counter-genre?) than Slatter's earlier collection The Girl With No Hands - it is an immersive and even interlinked gathering of stories. Valuing atmospheric storytelling over subversive formal techniques that inject modern mores to 'correct' traditional folk and fairy tales (even if this is a feminist book, broadly speaking), Slatte [...]

    11. Elena Mauri says:

      Usually this is not a genre I love but this book was totally astonishing, I literally couldn't put it down. It took me so long to read it just because my knowledge of english is limited. This novel is the result of several shot stories, all set in a fictional time and place. It surprised me the incredible ability of Angela Slatter of describing the story so well I felt I was there without even knowing it. It is not only for people who are particularly into the fairy tales world, it's written jus [...]

    12. Theo says:

      I'll be a dissenting voice: I thought her prose was lovely (most of the time) but that the stories themselves weren't particularly engaging and tended to run together. For a fuller explanation, see here.

    13. Linguana says:

      This was absolute perfection!For my complete review in all its gushing fangirly glory, click here

    14. Scott says:

      Wonderful. Lyrical in every sense of the word. Ties nicely to Sourdough.

    15. Susie Munro says:

      exquisite modern gothic collection intricately woven together to form a creepy and evocative whole

    16. Alan Baxter says:

      Quite simply I love Slatter's writing and her stories. I can't recommend this highly enough, and also Sourdough & Other Stories.

    17. William says:

      This was amazingly good. It's a composite novel of dark fantasy / fairy tales. Somewhat feminist, very atmospheric.

    18. Leslee says:

      Seriously fucking amazing. If you're an Angela Carter fan pick this up.

    19. Chele says:

      Magnificent.

    20. Maria Haskins says:

      An absolutely captivating collection of connected short stories, delving into a dark and uniquely imagined world of magic, shapeshifting, spells, and craft. Angela Slatter's prose is so beautiful, it makes every story a gem.

    21. Hannah says:

      The tone in here it was amazing, eerie, antiquated, a little bit mysterious. I regret missing the connections until over halfway through. I think it's worth a read, fingers crossed for the audiobook.

    22. Crystal says:

      Creepy fairy tales

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