Aśvaghoṣa
Life of the Buddha
May 21, 2019 Comments.. 284
Life of the Buddha The Buddhist monk Ashvaosha composed Life of the Buddha in the first or second century CE probably in Ayodhya This is the earliest surviving text of the Sanskrit literary genre called kavya and probab

  • Title: Life of the Buddha
  • Author: Aśvaghoṣa
  • ISBN: 9780814762165
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Buddhist monk Ashvaosha composed Life of the Buddha in the first or second century CE probably in Ayodhya This is the earliest surviving text of the Sanskrit literary genre called kavya and probably provided models for Kali.dasa s famous works The most poignant scenes on the path to his Awakening are when the young prince Siddhartha, the future Buddha, is conThe Buddhist monk Ashvaosha composed Life of the Buddha in the first or second century CE probably in Ayodhya This is the earliest surviving text of the Sanskrit literary genre called kavya and probably provided models for Kali.dasa s famous works The most poignant scenes on the path to his Awakening are when the young prince Siddhartha, the future Buddha, is confronted by the reality of sickness, old age, and death, while seduced by the charms of the women employed to keep him at home A poet of the highest order, Ashvaosha s aim is not entertainment but instruction, presenting the Buddha s teaching as the culmination of the Brahmanical tradition His wonderful descriptions of the bodies of courtesans are ultimately meant to show the transience of beauty.Co published by New York University Press and the JJC FoundationFor on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http claysanskritlibrary

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      Published :2019-05-21T22:16:47+00:00

    1 Blog on “Life of the Buddha

    1. Mark Surya says:

      It's a classical Sanskrit poem. As Eliot Weinberger observes in his most recent book, for whatever reason, Sanskrit poetry has never really found it's style in English translation, the way that other Asian languages have---Japanese and Chinese for sure, but also Tamil, etc. So I was under no illusion that I was going to be reading a masterwork of poetry here. Olivelle's translation is pleasant, clear in it's imagery and easy to read. That's basically everything you want out of famously intermina [...]

    2. Robin Friedman says:

      The Life Of The Buddha In The Clay Sanskrit LibraryBetween 2005 -- 2009, the Clay Sanskrit Library engaged in the ambitious project of publishing titles from the flowering of Sanskrit beginning at about the time of the Common Era. The series, modeled on the Loeb Classical Library, was sponsored by John Clay (1934 -- 2013), who had studied Sanskrit in his youth before going on to a successful career in global investment banking. The series consists of 54 books of poetry, drama, novels, and philos [...]

    3. David says:

      Beautiful translation of this very important epic poem.

    4. Danielle says:

      I'm just not a fan of medieval Indian courtly poetry.

    5. Matt says:

      I thought this book was tough to get through because of all the cultural context required to understand the allusions. I want to follow them, so I follow the endnotes, but that just makes reading all the more difficult. I also am frequently bothered when I think I'm hearing Asvaghosa speak in place of the Buddha - though this is something that bothers me in many religious texts. I think I would appreciate this text much more if I knew how to read Sanskrit. I feel like I'm reading Shakespeare in [...]

    6. Casey Hadford says:

      Less about Buddhism or the Buddha and more about Asvaghosa's idea of the Buddha. By deifying him, he does him a disservice as he makes the Buddha's path to enlightenment seem incredibly effortless for him. Interesting read, but not the best choice if you want to learn about Buddhism.

    7. Bella says:

      Beauty is. Unless you experience how can you say it? When you say it, is it full ? May be I am borrowing from scriptures how can you attain the non-attainable ? How can you be on, when duality exists in you. for how long you can pretend to be ?

    8. John Yelverton says:

      Cute little tale about the life of Buddha while highlighting and proclaiming his bankrupt and hypocritical philosophy.

    9. J. says:

      Very interesting, and gives a good idea of the Buddhist lifestyle and philosopy

    10. Alex says:

      The true life story of Gautama Siddhartha, written by someone who was actually there.First 14 ch of 28.

    11. Jessica Zu says:

      Patrick Olivelle's translation is beautiful, a joy to read. In my mind,it's much better than the Chinese translation 佛所行赞.

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